Vanuatu – Travel Advice & Safety

As a travel destination, Vanuatu ticks almost all of the boxes, with an idyllic island lifestyle, fresh seafood and plenty of locally grown organic fruits and vegetables available. When it comes to staying healthy and avoiding diseases, this is also easy for travellers to Vanuatu. Read on to find out which vaccinations are usually recommended for travellers to Vanuatu. Make sure that you speak with the doctor about your travel plans and what vaccines might be required, as well as particular concerns or questions you might have.

This website provides general advice on vaccinations for Vanuatu and is not a substitute for adequate medical advice from the Travel Vaccination Clinic doctor or your own doctor. Please ensure you inform the doctor during your appointment if you are not completely up to date with routine vaccinations OR if you have previously had an adverse reaction to any vaccine or medication.

Checklist

  • Ensure you are up to date with childhood vaccinations
  • Practice proper food safety and hygiene such as drinking boiled or bottled water, hand washing and eating in cleaner looking restaurants when possible
  • Avoid mosquito bites where possible
  • Inform the Travel Vaccination Clinic of your full travel plans and itinerary during your appointment

Which vaccinations are required for travel to Vanuatu?

Vanuatu is a relatively disease-free region of the world, and one of the few parts of the globe where the lifestyle supports fresh, healthy foods, outdoor activities and air, water and soil quality are good. There are a few key vaccines which you may need before visiting Vanuatu, however, so do ask about these before speaking to the Travel Vaccination Clinic doctor and let them know of all of your travel plans, including other destinations you may be visiting in the near future.

Routine Vaccinations

Make sure that you are up to date on all routine childhood vaccinations before visiting Vanuatu. This includes vaccinations for measles, mumps and rubella, chicken pox, polio and others. If you are unsure whether you have had the full round of childhood vaccines let the doctor know, and consider having any booster shots recommended to you. To get the most effective protection against diseases, ensure you visit the doctor around six weeks prior to leaving for Vanuatu so that there is time to administer any necessary shots and for them to take effect.

Hepatitis A

You may come into contact with the Hepatitis A virus through contaminated food or water in Vanuatu, and this vaccine is recommended for most travellers, especially if you do visit rural and remote areas or spend long periods of time staying in Vanuatu. For more information on this vaccine and general advice, please see the Hepatitis A information page.

Typhoid

Typhoid exists in Vanuatu and can be passed on through contaminated food or water. Please read the general information on this vaccine on the Typhoid information page. The typhoid vaccine will be strongly recommended if you are travelling to rural areas, visiting friends or relatives in Vanuatu, or if you are an adventurous eater. Please discuss your plans with the doctor for further advice.

Both Hepatitis A and Typhoid vaccinations can be administered in one shot, and this lasts for a number of years once given. Ask the Travel Vaccination Clinic about getting vaccinated against Hepatitis A and Typhoid, as well as taking food safety precautions.

Practicing good food safety hygiene, hand washing and following common sense procedures to avoid excessive contact with germs is always recommended no matte where you are travelling.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B can be transmitted (passed between people) through meeting new partners, getting a tattoo or piercing or undergo cosmetic medical procedures. The disease can be contracted through sexual contact, or exposure to needles or bodily fluids in general so the vaccine is highly recommended for anyone who might undertake activities that put them at risk of contracting Hepatitis B. If you have to undergo any medical procedure or visit a doctor in Vanuatu try to ensure the equipment is properly sterilised. For more information visit the Hepatitis B page.

Malaria

Malaria is transmitted to humans via mosquito bite, and mosquitos may be carrying the virus in Vanuatu. For further information on malaria in general, visit the malaria information page.

There are precautions to take against mosquito bites such as using repellent, wearing long, loose clothing, using a mosquito net where possible and avoiding contact with flying insects, ask the doctor about these.